Archive for the ‘Gospel’ Category

Frankie Knuckles 1955-2014 | Warehouse Top 50
April 2, 2014

As you might imagine, the tributes have been comming in hard and fast since the news was formally announced.  The following playlist was put together by the geniuses over at Red Bull Music Academy (RBMA) and its a stellar snapshot into those old Philly and gospel sounds that shaped what the Warehouse and in turn Frankie’s reputation. Taken directly from the tracklist Frankie listed in the seminal book “Last Night A DJ Saved My Life” , its an awesome collection of tracks. So give the history a listen and have some fun fun. Learn the words, sing along. This is music for dancing!

RIP Loleatta Holloway
March 22, 2011

Loleatta Holloway

Its a sad sad day for music. We lost one of the truly great female vocalists. In this day of autotune and refined marketability, Holloway continued to find cuts of her vocals in all manner of music, in many cases without any financial compensation. Her voice remains one of the most sampled in the history of music with Love Sensation being one of the most prolific accapella’s of all time.

I grew up with Loleatta Holloway’s voice, from the originals back in the early to mid Eighties to the rise of the sampler and House & Garage tunes from 1987 onwards. From that point on, I dont think ive heard more than 20 different electronic tracks before I find one with a vocal from Holloway. Ive lost the plot with her, i’ve danced around a field with her voice floating across the fields, heard in raves, mixtapes, hardcore, house, drum & bass, commercials, movie trailers, on my ipod about four times a day and i’d hazard a guess that she was playing the day I got married. There are very few artists that I know of that can claim to have been in the collective audio unconscious of sample based music lovers for almost four decades.

She was one of the truly great vocalists of our time and one that will be very sorely missed by me. In an effort to do any kind of justice to this memory, lets get the music underway.

RIP Loleatta Holloway, you were fucking amazing.

…the key to her appeal is that she doesn’t push herself too far to the front. The pleasure of listening to divas like Whitney or Rihanna is that it’s an aspirational experience – women want to be them, men want to be with them. Holloway is a different proposition: a collective experience, of mutual understanding and shared joy. She takes the utopian ideals of clubland – sex, community, abandon – and massively amplifies them back at the dancers, singing to each one of them and the club as a whole. As her voice surges onto and fills the dancefloor, it really does feel like we’re all getting stronger.
Taken from a Great Obituary from the Guardian

Aretha Franklin – Rocksteady [1972]
August 3, 2010

Buried deep on Franklin’s seminal 1972 album “Young, Gifted and Black”, Rocksteady is a track that is hard to ignore. Taken on its own, its a great funk styled breakbeat belter. But seat this into a breaking set and you’ll see the place go mental. Its all about Aretha’s soulful vocals over those crackin breaks provided by drummer, Bernard Purdie. Absolutely legendary break specialist. Absolute corker.

From Discogs
The Queen of Soul delivers a truly stunning album that is surely her finest and one of the greatest pieces of Soul music ever made. Aretha’s vocals on this album are breathtaking and incredibly moving. From the powerful black Soul power of ‘Young, Gifted and Black’, and the sweet soulful funk of ‘Rock Steady’ right through to the stunning and mesmerising closing track that lifts your spirits through the sky ‘Border Song (Holy Moses). This is essential and timeless Soul music.

Amen Brother – The Wilsons [1969]
October 13, 2009

Does it REALLY need an intro?

The “Amen Break”, “Amen”, or imitations thereof, are frequently used as sampled drum loops in hip hop, jungle, breakcore and drum and bass music. It is 5.20 seconds long and consists of four bars of the drum-solo sampled from the song “Amen, Brother” as performed by the 1960s funk and soul outfit The Winstons. The song is an up-tempo instrumental rendition of an older gospel music classic. The Winstons’ version was released as a B-side of the 45 RPM 7-inch vinyl single “Color Him Father” in 1969 on Metromedia (MMS-117), and is currently available on several compilations and on a 12-inch vinyl re-release together with other songs by The Winstons.